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Standard and ThinNet Ethernet

Thick and ThinNet Ethernet: 10-Mbps


As a result of research done at Xerox Corporation in the early 1970s, Ethernet has evolved into the most widely implemented physical and Data link layer protocol today. Most common are Ethernet over twisted pair to connect end systems, and fiber optic versions for site backbones. It is standardized as IEEE 802.3.


The older versions of Ethernet are known as Thick (standard) and ThinNet Ethernet, standards that support speeds up to 10-Mbps.


Thin Ethernet (ThinNet) (10BASE2)
  • Uses “Thin“ coax cable (RG58A/U or RG58C/U).
  • The maximum length of one segment is 185 metres.
  • The maximum number of segments is five.
  • The maximum total length of all segments is 925 metres.
  • The minimum distance between T-connectors is 0.5 metres.
  • No more than 30 connections per segment are allowed.
  • T-connectors must be plugged directly into each device.

Standard (Thick) Ethernet (10BASE5)
  • Uses “Thick“ coax cable with N-type connectors for a backbone and a transceiver cable with 15-pin connectors from the transceiver to the network interface card.
  • The maximum number of segments is five, but only three can have computers attached. The others are for network extension.
  • The maximum length of one segment is 500 metres.
  • The maximum total length of all segments is 2500 metres.
  • The maximum length of one transceiver cable is 50 metres.
  • The minimum distance between transceivers is 2.5 metres.
  • No more than 100 transceiver connections per segment are allowed. A repeater counts as a station for both segments.


Learn more: Fast and Giga Ethernet: 100 and 1000-Mbps

 
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